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30 Things to Get Rid of Before 2019

30 Things to Get Rid of Before 2019

Hey everyone,

Coming into the end of the year, I always like to do a little declutter before the holidays… this year I took it to another level. And, Im glad I did because every time I’ve decluttered in the past, two things would happen:

1) I would end up holding on to a lot of things I wanted to toss because of guilt, how much I spent on the item, or fear of needing it in the future.

2) My house would always return to be somewhat cluttered rather quickly.

What I’m coming to embrace is a more minimal lifestyle. I have always resonated with Feng Shui, which is basically the idea that every item you have holds an energy, therefore you should only keep what radiates positive energy. Although, I realized how I haven’t been living to this idea fully because I would keep those things which made me feel guilt for not using or thinking of tossing them, especially unused gifts. Every time I saw these items, I’d feel bad about it. Every time I saw a book I was going to read but didn’t finish I felt bad about it, and even that canvas I never finished painting. Each item you keep demands to be kept up with and cared for. This can be very distracting, and we don’t even realize it consciously.

I decided that guilt isn’t going to stop me from listening to my intuition, and neither is the fear of scarcity for getting rid of something I might later use even though I haven’t used it in a year or more. This led to a massive declutter and since it felt so freeing for me, I’m sure it will spark the same joy for you to know that your space is only filled with the things that give you real happiness and are absolutely functional. So, let’s go ahead and dive into my list of 30 things you should get rid of before 2019 organized in the order of the Konmari Method of decluttering, developed by Marie Kondo. The Konmari Method orders the decluttering process into categories which allows you to begin with things that are easier to toss, and end with the harder things so that your intuition will strengthen as you get to the end so you will not be having so many doubts of what to toss and what actually brings you joy.

  1. Clothes that don’t fit you properly, comfortably, or are just not your style. I was able to really define my style with this declutter. When I used to shop trends, I ended up with various different styles that didn’t necessarily fit my personality.
  2. Shoes that kill your feet. I have only two pairs of heels left. Toms, flip flops, and work shoes.
  3. Jewelry you never wear. All that tarnished stuff can go, gold can get pawned. Unless it’s something very special to you, let it go.
  4. Socks without a mate, or that have holes in them.
  5. Underwear and bras that are looking a little too worn or are uncomfortable. We tend to hold on to these longer than regular clothes as we justify with the thought that no one really sees them.
  6. Books and Magazines you no longer read, have never read, will never read. The hardest thing for me to declutter by far. I held on to books as a part of me, and refused to read ebooks. But I found that I love audiobooks and it’s been an excellent substitution for me.
  7. Papers like insurance policies, bank account information, etc. All these papers should be scanned and saved into a Cloud drive. They are much safer there and take up zero physical space.
  8. Old bills, bank statements, and mail. Go paperless, this can all be found online.
  9. Business Cards. I have a note in my phone saved with photos of business cards I think I may one day reference, I tossed the physical version.
  10. Old journals, and notebooks. Have you ever actually looked at these for reference?
  11. DVDs, CDs, Video Games, and Consoles.
  12. Craft supplies you never use, for me this is something that took a weight off my shoulders because I don’t particularly love painting, but I had a lot of supplies and unfinished works staring at me for completion.
  13. Board Games.
  14. Pet supplies.
  15. Old cameras, Laptops, and other tech.
  16. Toxic cleaning products; replace them with an all purpose natural cleaner. You really only need one or two cleaners for your whole house.
  17. Pantry Items in your kitchen that are old or you will never use. Same goes for inside the fridge!
  18. Excess utensils, bowls, plates, and cups.
  19. Home decor you no longer vibe with and holiday decor that’s old, broken, or unused.
  20. Tools in the garage or toolbox that aren’t functional and used.
  21. Toxic beauty products. Switch them out this year for something safer.
  22. Clutter in your medicine cabinet like prescriptions and other medications that are expired.
  23. Excess makeup brushes, duplicate tweezers, beauty tools that are unused or broken.
  24. Miscellaneous items that have no home.
  25. Sentimental items that can be scanned and saved into cloud storage.
  26. Old trophies, take a photo of them and let them go. What good do they do in a box you never open?
  27. Excess bags, storage containers, and other containers.
  28. Just in case items.
  29. Apps and photos cluttering your digital space.
  30. Souvenirs. Take a photo from now on, it’ll last longer!

Some of these items are difficult to get rid of, but when you see the piles of things your donating or recycling that you just don’t love, you will really re-evaluate your spending habits. Make sure to give these items up responsibly to a thrift shop or recycle everything you can. Try not to give too many things out to loved ones and clutter their homes. Only give items to loved ones if you KNOW they will love and use it. With all this gone you will feel a lot lighter, and I can bet you will notice a new sense of peace and gratitude for the things you have left.

Moving forward, I always like to keep a ongoing bag of things to donate or toss in my home so that as things come in they are also exiting instead of accumulating. This will prevent you from having to do a massive declutter again.

Thanks so much for reading and I know this will be a huge reset for you as we move into the beginning of a new year. It definitely has been for me!

Some photos of what I got rid of:

(plus a whole lot more, not pictured)

How to Organize the Konmari Way | The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up

How to Organize the Konmari Way | The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up

Welcome everyone to the final day of our Seven Day Konmari Declutter Challenge!

If you haven’t been following along to the challenge, let’s get you caught up.

Decluttering your space is easiest when tackled by categories, organized in order of easiest items to discard, to hardest, like sentimental things. This is why the Konmari Method was developed. Marie Kondo, a Japanese Decluttering Consultant, is an expert of her work, helping hoarders to declutter things they could previously never part with and in turn shift their life’s around because as they let go of their unwanted items, they simultaneously seem to let go of their unwanted thoughts, release negative people, and shake bad habits as well.

In the book she wrote “The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up,” she walks the reader through the same process she walks her clients through. The method is more deeply illustrated in my previous article How to Declutter the Konmari Way | The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo but, in short she guides the reader to start with the one category, take all the items from that category out from anywhere in the home and place it out so you can see the mass of all the items you have in that category, then to hold each object and see if it sparks any joy to you. Going with your intuition, you will discard anything that doesn’t spark joy! For whatever reason, regardless of any excuse, it has to go. We made it through the whole process of decluttering by category, and now we have made it to the last step Marie Kondo suggests, which is to organize.

This is the seventh and final day of our challenge we are addressing now, so if you missed the first of the series go ahead and click here to tackle that one. If you’re all caught up to speed, let begin with our challenge of organizing all the items we kept in our homes the Konmari way.

To begin we will start in the closet, and take a look at our clothing.

  • Marie Kondo says it is best to vertically fold our clothing, and to hang anything up that would look “happier” on a hanger. This means pants, t-shirts, sturdier blouses, pajamas, shorts, and jeans are most likely going to be folded in the vertical manner she describes. Things like bulky sweaters, coats, and flowy blouses will hold their shape better on a hanger, and should be hung in your closet from dark and bulky to light and airy, in an ascending fashion.

To fold vertically, I will demonstrate with some photos. If you’d like to skip this step for some reason, just scroll past the photos. But, it truly saves so much space in your drawers so, I recommend following along.

 Folding pants or jeans:

 Folding shorts:

Folding tops:

Finished product:

  • Marie Kondo also advises to fold socks and underwear as well. I may have felt a bit neurotic while doing this step, but in the spirit of living the whole method out fully, I did it, and was actually very impressed that my square storage box was transformed from being full of items I had to dig through to locate any given thing, to taking up only the space across the bottom perimeter of the bin. I’m not going to display my underwear drawer here but to show you how to fold this drawer I will link a video tutorial by Marie Kondo at the bottom of this article.
  • Store smaller bags inside of larger bags in order to save space! This could go for hats as well. This is a great tip because you not only maintain the beautiful shape of your beloved bag, you also cut in half the amount of space it all takes up.
  • Another tip from the book was that you don’t need to go out and buy special storage and organization drawers, boxes, ect. She says it is best to make due of things you already own, and even use things like shoe boxes to store items. She mentioned how she would in the past spend lots of money on fancy organization and storage items, when the true work shouldn’t have been in artfully organizing her things, it should be in discarding fully and completely so she didn’t have an excess of things to organize.

Next, we will step out of the closet and into the miscellaneous areas of the house.

 

  • The main point to mention about this is to store like with like. Marie Kondo’s entire Konmari Method revolves around grouping items into categories to discard in that way. This is so you can see the full mass of the objects you own in a given category and easily see if you have any duplicates or if you begin to accumulate excess. So, going ahead and storing all your items in a way where they are categorized allows you to see exactly how much you own, and you will know if it is time to declutter that category right away with a glance.
  • If you can, let dishes and your sponge dry outside on a balcony or patio. This she mentioned as a way to keep your workspace in the kitchen clear and open for use. The sunlight also provides a lovely antibacterial quality to clean your sponge and prevent that nasty mildew smell.
  • Store papers and books vertically. If you store these things horizontally, the weight of the top items does a lot of damage to the paper or book on the bottom of the stack. Also, it is impossible to access the bottom items if stored in this manner. Store vertically so you can easily see every single paper or book on your shelf, and once the shelf becomes too full you will be able to see that it is time to declutter again.

 

So, how do you feel? You made it all the way through the entire Konmari Method process!

Moving forward, continue to assess the items you bring into your home, asking yourself constantly if they spark any joy.

I suggest keeping a box in your home or car just for things you accumulate that need to be donated at any given time. Following the 1 in 1 out rule going forward has helped me especially through the holiday season.

Please comment so I can hear how your journey went, and how this has helped you!

Happy New Year!

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Video tutorial of Marie Kondo organizing and folding an underwear drawer

How to Declutter your Sentimental Things the Konmari Way | The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo

How to Declutter your Sentimental Things the Konmari Way | The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo

Welcome everyone to the sixth day of our Seven Day Konmari Declutter Challenge!

If you haven’t been following along to the challenge, let’s get you caught up.

Decluttering your space is easiest when tackled by categories, organized in order of easiest items to discard, to hardest, like sentimental things. This is why the Konmari Method was developed. Marie Kondo, a Japanese Decluttering Consultant, is an expert of her work, helping hoarders to declutter things they could previously never part with and in turn shift their lives around because as they let go of their unwanted items, they simultaneously seem to let go of their unwanted thoughts, release negative people, and shake bad habits as well.

In the book she wrote “The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up,” she walks the reader through the same process she walks her clients through. The method is more deeply illustrated in my previous article How to Declutter the Konmari Way | The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo but, in short she guides the reader to start with the one category, take all the items from that category out from anywhere in the home and place it out so you can see the mass of all the items you have in that category, then to hold each object and see if it sparks any joy to you. Going with your intuition, you will discard anything that doesn’t spark joy! For whatever reason, regardless of any excuse, it has to go.

This is the sixth and final category we are addressing now, so if you missed the first of the series go ahead and click here to tackle that one. If you’re all caught up to speed, let begin with category six:

Sentimental Items!

You’ve made it through all the other categories, if you followed the method as illustrated, which means your intuition and “discarding muscle” is strong and ready for this challenge.

So, like with all the other categories, go ahead and dig out every sentimental item from any corner of your home.


Sentimental Items Include:

  • Photos
  • Diaries
  • Albums
  • Souvenirs
  • Scrapbooks
  • Notes from loved ones
  • Drawings from loved ones
  • Trophies
  • Family Heirlooms
  • Ticket Stubs from events
  • Cards

Lay out these items in front of you, spread out evenly so you can see all you own.

Now, I’d like you to acknowledge each item, one by one, asking if it sparks you any joy.

Being honest with yourself, you will most likely find some things here that are definitely bringing you loads of joy and that you want to keep. Keep these items! No guilt, no shame, just keep them. But, really be honest with yourself.

Lots of my sentimental items actually carried a negative energy and brought up some weird emotions. Holding on to things like notes from and ex lover, funeral pamphlets from your late best friend, and the like, are not necessary to keep. There are tons of better ways to remember your late loved one, and the ex should probably not be remembered as it’s taking you away from your current relationships.

Other items, may just bring up apathy. Or even guilt. Try to avoid keeping these items as well, and remember that there are still other sentimental items you enjoy fully that you can keep.

If you are truly being drawn to minimizing your life, you may feel like even some heirlooms are a burden more than they are functional and purposeful to keep. I suggest giving these to another family member if this feeling arises, maybe someone who’s a bit more sentimental about items and will look at it as a blessing.

About that blanket that was your grandmothers who passed away, if you love it keep it, but if you don’t, it can be loved by someone else when you donate it. The blanket is not your grandmother, or whoever. When you release the things you are attached to that are kept from loved ones who have passed, you truly let go of your attachment to them, and they are free to be with you in only a positive way.

For the items you do love, but are troubled by holding on to, take photos of them, or  scan the papers or photographs onto your computer and save them to a Cloud drive so that they will be safe forever. You can even create an digital photo album or scrapbook of the items you let go of that you still want to remember at times and be able to look through for a hit of nostalgia.

 

Woohoo!

We almost made it to the end of our Seven Day Konmari Declutter Challenge! Now since we are done discarding, tomorrow we will take the time to organize all the objects in our home following the techniques of Marie Kondo.

If your ready to head over to the last challenge, click here.

Until then, many blessings, and happy New Year,

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How to Declutter your Komono (Miscellany) the Konmari Way Part 2 | The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo

How to Declutter your Komono (Miscellany) the Konmari Way Part 2

Welcome everyone to day five of our Seven Day Konmari Declutter Challenge!

If you haven’t been following along to the challenge, let’s get you caught up.

Decluttering your space is easiest when tackled by categories, organized in order of easiest items to discard, to hardest, like sentimental things. This is why the Konmari Method was developed. Marie Kondo, a Japanese Decluttering Consultant, is an expert of her work, helping hoarders to declutter things they could previously never part with and in turn shift their lives around because as they let go of their unwanted items, they simultaneously seem to let go of their unwanted thoughts, release negative people, and shake bad habits as well.

In the book she wrote “The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up,” she walks the reader through the same process she walks her clients through. The method is more deeply illustrated in my previous article How to Declutter the Konmari Way | The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo but, in short she guides the reader to start with the one category, take all the items from that category out from anywhere in the home and place it out so you can see the mass of all the items you have in that category, then to hold each object and see if it sparks any joy to you. Going with your intuition, you will discard anything that doesn’t spark joy! For whatever reason, regardless of any excuse, it has to go.

This is the fifth category we are addressing now, so if you missed the first of the series go ahead and click here to tackle that one. If you’re all caught up to speed, let begin with category five:

Komono (Miscellany) Part 2


Decluttering your Komono is broken into a wide variety of subcategories. The subcategories include:

  • General
  • Kids
  • Office
  • Cleaning
  • Kitchen
  • Decor
  • Garage
  • Bathroom

Yesterday you should’ve tackled the first half of the Miscellany in your home, but if you haven’t click here. Today, we will finish off this Miscellany declutter by investigating our Decor, Garage, and Bathroom type items.


Miscellany Decor

To kick off today’s declutter, we will explore our decorations. This goes for all the decor in your home currently in use, and not. This also goes for “knick-knacks” and things like that.

Let’s pull out items including and similar to:

  • Paintings
  • Coasters
  • Knick-knacks
  • Plants
  • Chests
  • Statues
  • Wall decor
  • Mirrors
  • Holiday decor and lights
  • Wreaths
  • Baskets
  • Lamps
  • Candles
  • Collectibles
  • Furniture
  • Rugs
  • Decorative pillows and throw blankets
  • Picture Frames
  • Vases

Ask yourself which of these items are bring you joy.

Which items are starting to become more work to keep because of the extra dusting they make you do? Which ones are creating clutter and you just don’t have room to keep? And lastly, which ones are no longer your taste? Let them go to someone who will love them.

Garage Miscellany

Shifting our focus now to the garage clutter. These are the items which can go into a toolbox, as well as other utility items.

These items can include:

  • Light bulbs
  • Flash lights
  • Hardware
  • Tools
  • Yard and Gardening care supplies
  • Power tools

Asess what is not bringing you joy and ease in your life any longer. Which items could be better rented or borrowed when the day comes you actually need them? Which ones do you have multiple of already? Give these items to someone who can use them regulary.

Bathroom Miscellany

Finally, to complete all the Miscellaneous items in your home we will visit the bathroom-type Miscellany.

What’s included in this subcategory is:

  • Toiletries
  • Makeup
  • Makeup brushes
  • Hair supplies
  • Hair brushes
  • Bedding
  • Towels
  • Medicine
  • Tweezers and Trimmers
  • Razors
  • Nail cutters, files, buffers, and polishes
  • Toothbrushes
  • Travel size items

What I would like you to consider here is the joy each item does or does not bring you, as well as the expiration date, and the amount of toxic chemicals residing in the ingredient label of your toiletries.

I’ve managed to consolidate my makeup down to only non toxic beauty products I use daily. There are only shades of makeup left that look becoming on me. I’ve also managed to rid myself of travel size items I never use, medicine that is expired in my cabinet, and makeup brushes that are not my go-to’s.

Keep what you love, and as I’m sure you’re exceptional at by this part of the process, let the rest go!

Voila, your Miscellany is uncluttered and we are just about done with the entire house! Click here to move on to the next challenge.

Love and blessings,

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How to Declutter Your Komono (Miscellany) the Konmari Way Part 1 | The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo

How to Declutter your Komono (Miscellany) the Konmari Way Part 1

Welcome everyone to day four of our Seven Day Konmari Declutter Challenge!

If you haven’t been following along to the challenge, let’s get you caught up.

Decluttering your space is easiest when tackled by categories, organized in order of easiest items to discard, to hardest, like sentimental things. This is why the Konmari Method was developed. Marie Kondo, a Japanese Decluttering Consultant, is an expert of her work, helping hoarders to declutter things they could previously never part with and in turn shift their lives around because as they let go of their unwanted items, they simultaneously seem to let go of their unwanted thoughts, release negative people, and shake bad habits as well.

In the book she wrote “The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up,” she walks the reader through the same process she walks her clients through. The method is more deeply illustrated in my previous article How to Declutter the Konmari Way | The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo but, in short she guides the reader to start with the one category, take all the items from that category out from anywhere in the home and place it out so you can see the mass of all the items you have in that category, then to hold each object and see if it sparks any joy to you. Going with your intuition, you will discard anything that doesn’t spark joy! For whatever reason, regardless of any excuse, it has to go.

This is the fourth category we are addressing now, so if you missed the first of the series go ahead and click here to tackle that one. If you’re all caught up to speed, let begin with category four:

Komono (Miscellany) Part 1


Decluttering your Komono is broken into a wide variety of subcategories. The subcategories include:

  • General
  • Kids
  • Office
  • Cleaning
  • Kitchen
  • Decor
  • Garage
  • Bathroom

Today we are going to tackle the first half, which will include items falling in the subcategories General, Kids, Office, Cleaning, and Kitchen.


General Miscellany

Let’s begin with General. Items falling in this category includes:

  • DVDs and CDs
  • Video games
  • Consoles
  • Cords
  • Remotes
  • Craft supplies
  • Coins
  • Junk drawer items
  • Pet supplies
  • And anything else without a proper home or category.

Grab all these items from around your home and lay them all out for you to see.

Go ahead and begin picking up each item one by one and asking yourself the golden question: “does this item bring me joy?”

If it doesn’t let it go, most of this won’t bring you a bit of joy or use and is unnecessary clutter.

Kids Miscellany

Next, let’s go into the subcategory Kid’s things if this applies to you.

Kid’s items include:

  • Children’s books
  • Indoor and outdoor toys
  • Board games
  • Puzzles
  • Sports and hobbies items
  • Ect.

Get all these items together in the room with you and spread them out.

If these toys are used regularly by your kiddos, definitely give them the job of asking themselves the question of if the item spark’s joy. It’s disrespectful to rid someone else of their things. Even if their half your size!

If you know that they are not useful to your child, then you can probably get away with removing them without asking, especially if they have duplicates of one thing. This is really up to your judgement though of course.

Office Miscellany

Third, let’s roll out the Office subcategory, and dive into the world of staplers, paper clips, and ball point pens.

Items include but not limited to:

  • Tape dispensers
  • Staplers
  • Paper clips
  • Binders (not the contents, this should be handles with the paper’s category discussed in my previous article _______)
  • Folders
  • Organizers
  • Tacks
  • White Boards
  • Erasers
  • Pens, pencils

Scavenge all these types of items out from all corners of your home, hopefully you’ve been able to maintain them in just your desk or office area.

Lay each item out, pick one up at a time to assess the golden question of if it brings you joy, or for this category, if it brings you use.

Let go of anything broken, needing replacement, or just that ran out of purpose in your home.

Cleaning Miscellany

Time to open of that cupboard under the sink to explore what cleaning supplies you’ve collected.

I would like to start this category by saying I personally think you should consider tossing all specialty cleaners and substituting for one all purpose cleaner, and one cleaner for your bath tub. That’s all you truly need.

I would also like to say, it would be wise to discard all harsh cleaners with toxic ingredients and replace them with a nontoxic cleaner that is effective, and safe to use, inhale, and even taste if your child or pet were to come in to contact with an area you’ve just cleaned or even the whole container.

For the safest ingredients, make your own cleaner by combining Dr. Bronners Castile Soap, filtered water, Apple Cider Vinegar, and your favorite high quality essential oil into a spray bottle. This will save you money, and save your health in the meantime.

Some of the products you should be decluttering include:

  • Laundry soaps
  • Dryer Sheets
  • Car cleaning supplies
  • Window cleaners
  • Mops
  • Brooms
  • Vacuums
  • Steamers
  • Irons
  • Cleaning wipes
  • Stove top cleaners
  • Oven cleaners
  • Dish soaps
  • Sponges
  • All purpose cleaners

Lay out all you have so you can see the full amount of all you own in this subcategory.

Are any of your brooms, mops, or vacuums broken? Do you have any duplicates of cleaners? Can you replace any of your cleaners with an all purpose cleaner to minimize the amount of stuff that you own and eventually would need to replenish?

Release whats no longer of service to you, or the health of your home.

Kitchen Miscellany

The last subcategory of the “Komono” category we will be addressing today is items residing in the kitchen. The rest will be discussed in the following article which you can read tomorrow covering Decor, Garage, and Bathroom items.

The heart of the house is said to be the kitchen, where everyone gathers for a lovely meal over conversation and gratitude for shared company. This means it’s a place that can be well lived-in and hurriedly kept up with since theres generally so much cleaning to do in this space on a daily basis.

So, let’s take the time to give it the care and cleaning it deserves by decluttering it so that all that remains in this space is the items that are of necessity.

Kitchen items include:

  • Pots and pans
  • Bowls, plates, cups
  • Serving utensils
  • Silverware
  • Cutlery
  • Small appliances
  • Specialty appliances (waffle-makers, ice cream-makers, ect.)
  • Tubeware
  • Foods in the refrigerator, freezer, and pantry
  • Wine glasses
  • Cutting boards
  • Wine openers
  • Peelers
  • Graters
  • Can openers

All of these types of things can be arranged in your space where they can all be seen at once.

Picking up one item at a time, ask yourself if you need it, if it brings you joy, or if you have a duplicate of that same item?

A lot of the time we accumulate a large amount of serving utensils, when we don’t serve but four people at a time. We also end up with gifted mugs, and odd specialty appliances such as ice cream-makers, which begin to crowd space and collect dust. Be honest with yourself and how much you actually need. Mindfully let go of the remaining.

We have successfully decluttered half of the Miscellany in our homes at this time, reward yourself for the work you put into this process, and get ready to tackle the other half of the Miscellany tomorrow, or if your ready now click here.

Thank you for reading, and as always many blessings.

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How to Declutter your Papers the Konmari Way | The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo

How to Declutter your Papers the Konmari Way | The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo

Welcome everyone to day three of our Seven Day Konmari Declutter Challenge!

If you haven’t been following along to the challenge, let’s get you caught up.

Decluttering your space is easiest when tackled by categories, organized in order of easiest items to discard, to hardest, like sentimental things. This is why the Konmari Method was developed. Marie Kondo, a Japanese Decluttering Consultant, is an expert of her work, helping hoarders to declutter things they could previously never part with and in turn shift their lives around because as they let go of their unwanted items, they simultaneously seem to let go of their unwanted thoughts, release negative people, and shake bad habits as well.

In the book she wrote “The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up,” she walks the reader through the same process she walks her clients through. The method is more deeply illustrated in my previous article How to Declutter the Konmari Way | The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo but, in short she guides the reader to start with the one category, take all the items from that category out from anywhere in the home and place it out so you can see the mass of all the items you have in that category, then to hold each object and see if it sparks any joy to you. Going with your intuition, you will discard anything that doesn’t spark joy! For whatever reason, regardless of any excuse, it has to go.

This is the third category we are addressing now, so if you missed the first of the series go ahead and click here to tackle that one. If you’re all caught up to speed, let begin with category three.

Papers.


Papers include but are not limited to:

  • Insurance policies
  • Bank statements
  • Coupons
  • Business cards
  • Bank account information
  • Mail
  • School papers (tests, lecture notes, event information, project instructions, ect.)
  • Announcements and flyers
  • Brochures
  • Advertisements of any kind
  • Taxes
  • Files
  • Receipts
  • Warranties
  • Owner manuals
  • Greeting cards (non sentimental)
  • Checkbooks
  • Recipes

It is important not to include any notes or papers that are sentimental in any way in this category, according to Marie Kondo.

After you read through the document to see if it’s actually necessary to keep, I find it helpful to arrange into three piles, one to shred, one to recycle immediately, and one to keep.

This process can be daunting but papers are pretty annoying to hold on to, and I promise you don’t actually need 75 percent of what you have.

Once you get your papers into those three helpful piles, take the keep pile and create another two piles out of it. One is anything that can be scanned and saved into a Cloud Drive, and the other are hard files that may need to be kept in their physical form like your passport, birth certificate, and any business licenses.

Pretty much everything else can be scanned. Think of how much space you will be saving after everything is digitized and organized in files somewhere so safe that even if your house caught fire and your computer was destroyed, you can recover it.

That is the beauty of Cloud storage. Google Drive, Microsoft One Drive, and ICloud are excellent options that don’t charge anything when you stay within a certain amount of storage.

I have minimized my files dramatically, and now can easily access what I need when I need it. I’ve gotten rid of lecture notes I literally never study, and taken photos of what I may reference and saved that into a note on my IPhone.

I’ve also completely gotten rid of any business cards other than my own by snapping a photo and saving them to another note within my phone for quick easy access anytime I may need that contact information.

Marie Kondo also mentions that you should always store whatever papers are left vertically so that you can see clearly how much you have accumulated, and when it may be time to discard again. Of course, discarding as you go is key to staying tidy.

Like I mentioned in previous articles of this challenge, remember not to organize so much just yet, just focus on the discarding. Day seven of this challenge will be involved with organizing the Konmari way.

We are almost completely decluttered but we have four more challenges full of discarding and organizing to go!

Until then, take a breath in knowing that your important papers are accessible to you, and you don’t have a stack of mail to be attended to either.

If your ready, take on the next challenge by clicking here!

Thanks for reading,

How to Declutter your Books the Konmari Way | The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo

How to Declutter your Books the Konmari Way | The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo

Welcome everyone to day two of our Seven Day Konmari Declutter Challenge!

If you haven’t been following along to the challenge, let’s get you caught up.

Decluttering your space is easiest when tackled by categories, organized in order of easiest items to discard, to hardest, like sentimental things. This is why the Konmari Method was developed. Marie Kondo, a Japanese Decluttering Consultant, is an expert of her work, helping hoarders to declutter things they could previously never part with and in turn shift their lives around because as they let go of their unwanted items, they simultaneously seem to let go of their unwanted thoughts, release negative people, and shake bad habits as well.

In the book she wrote “The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up,” she walks the reader through the same process she walks her clients through. The method is more deeply illustrated in my previous article How to Declutter the Konmari Way | The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo but, in short she guides the reader to start with the one category, take all the items from that category out from anywhere in the home and place it out so you can see the mass of all the items you have in that category, then to hold each object and see if it sparks any joy to you. Going with your intuition, you will discard anything that doesn’t spark joy! For whatever reason, regardless of any excuse, it has to go.

This is the second category we are addressing now, so if you missed the first of the series go ahead and click here to tackle that one. If you’re all caught up to speed, let begin with category two:

Books.

This tended to be a difficult category for me when I began minimizing my life because I have a bit of an attachment to my books… Or the books I once had.

Yes, I made it out alive!

After listening to the audiobook “Goodbye Things” by Fumio Sasaki, I was able to clear away quite a bit because he said something I really identified with. Basically, he explained that the books you keep and showcase are mostly a representation of apart of your ego self that says “I’m intellectual and interested/knowledgable in all these diverse areas.”

Besides sentimental books, and those books which you reference frequently and that you whole-heartedly love and return to, that’s pretty much the extent of the reason why you hold on to a book you no longer use or love.

Once I understood this about my self, and once I discovered the magic of audiobooks, it was a little easier to get rid of some of these books I’ve attached to my persona.

If you are one of those bibliophiles who needs to hold the book and smell it, well, I feel you. I really do. I never was able to read an ebook. It just didn’t do the same for me. But, I assure you, there are a few ways to keep the joyous moments you feel when holding a book in your hands. You can always visit your public library, or buy the books then donate them once you’ve finished so they don’t begin stacking up.

If you don’t mind digitizing your approach to reading, my new favorite way is to download this amazing, and not boasted about enough app called Libby” Libby is an app that connects to your local library and allows you to download and stream audiobooks, and ebooks straight to your device. Then, after you finish, you return it just like a normal library book. The best thing is you don’t have to worry about not returning it in time, because upon the due date, it is automatically returned for you. You can always renew it if you need.

Now, I do have a few books left, mostly cookbooks I use regularly, and reference books I use, but I did keep some books that I truly love as well. If you find yourself not actually using the reference books you have, I recommend just letting them go and using google and other websites to get the info you need, when you need it.

“To truly cherish the things that are important to you, you must first discard those that have outlived their purpose.”

This quote by Marie Kondo speaks for more than just the items in our homes I’d say, and is symbolically and literally intertwined with the reason that after we declutter, we are also met with a release of much of the mental clutter we fell into.

So, Just like we did with our first category of clothing, go ahead and take out every single book you have in any area of the house.


This includes:

  • Cookbooks
  • Reference and Textbooks
  • Novels and other general books
  • Children’s books
  • Magazines
  • Phone books

Now, one by one begin your process of decluttering by holding each item and asking yourself if it brings you any joy.

Start creating your two piles, one for the books you love, and one for the books that you are apathetic about, or just don’t care about at all.

Once you are through with all the items, pack up the books you are parting with and be sure to discard them in a conscious way. You can donate them to the local library, or a thrift shop works as well.

Bask in the space you’ve created in your mind and shelves as you see that you no longer have that book you will never end up reading cluttering your life.

It is going to be exponentially easier for you to focus on the present tasks at hand when you only keep the books you are currently using.

Tomorrow, be ready to tackle another category.

Or, if your ready for the next category now, click here.

Many blessings,

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How to Declutter your Closet the Konmari Way | The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo

How to Declutter your Closet the Konmari Way | The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo

Welcome everyone to the first day of our Seven Day Konmari Declutter Challenge!

Decluttering your space is easiest when tackled by categories, organized in order of easiest items to discard, to hardest, like sentimental things. This is why the Konmari Method was developed. Marie Kondo, a Japanese Decluttering Consultant, is an expert of her work, helping hoarders to declutter things they could previously never part with and in turn shift their lives around because as they let go of their unwanted items, they simultaneously seem to let go of their unwanted thoughts, release negative people, and shake bad habits as well.

In the book she wrote “The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up,” she walks the reader through the same process she walks her clients through. The method is more deeply illustrated in my previous article How to Declutter the Konmari Way | The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo but, in short she guides the reader to start with the one category, take all the items from that category out from anywhere in the home and place it out so you can see the mass of all the items you have in that category, then to hold each object and see if it sparks any joy to you. Going with your intuition, you will discard anything that doesn’t spark joy! For whatever reason, regardless of any excuse, it has to go.

The first category she lists is clothing. Clothing was one of my favorite categories to declutter because this gives you the opportunity to truly define your style. Before decluttering my closet, I had clothing of many different tastes, most of which wasn’t my own, or was fast fashion items that are no longer trendy. I would wear these items because they were there, and most of the time I felt the outfit I chose that day didn’t showcase who I am and my individual style. This made me feel awkward and less than confident. Now, I have refined my closet to only items which go well with each other. That are versatile, and suit my timeless, earthy, minimalistic style.

Begin now by clearing out your entire closet. And, I mean everything!

Starting with tops, begin to hold each item of each category and let all of the items go that do not spark joy. Remember not to rationalize this so much. Have one pile for your hell yes’, and one for your no’s. Take a look at this checklist to be sure you don’t miss a thing! Remember to grab any articles you have in different areas of the house, it’s important to do this all at once.


  • Tops
  • Bottoms
  • Coats
  • Shoes
  • Scarves
  • Hats
  • Belts
  • Bags
  • Jewelry
  • Underwear
  • Socks
  • Pajamas
  • Workout Attire

Keep in mind the style you wish to create. Which Pinterest fashion boards do you identify most with? Let go of anything that doesn’t stick within your one style identity. I tried to only keep accessories and shoes that were black so that it was easy to match them with each other and stay cohesive with fewer items in my wardrobe.

Let go of all the uncomfortable shoes, itchy sweaters, and things that just don’t ever get worn. It’s easy to do this when you start to remember the clothing items you always fall back on regardless of how many items are in your wardrobe. Obviously, you really love something about those items and not the others. Even if it was expensive, if it doesn’t suit you, you don’t use it, or it’s uncomfortable, it needs to go. Someone else could love it more than you.

This isn’t apart of Marie Kondo’s method, but once you’ve made it through your entire wardrobe and have your two piles, go ahead and write out what you tend to love about each item, and what you don’t love.

Do you like the high rise cut in the jeans better than hip huggers? Or maybe you prefer a high neck line in your tops. What about styles you tend to prefer, and styles you know you have to do away with? Is there a color scheme you resonate with most closely?

All of this data is useful information for the next time you find yourself clothes shopping.

With this information in mind, you won’t find yourself purchasing and later regretting the buy. You’ll see what tends to be more timeless for you, so you won’t end up with a ton of last years trends in your wardrobe ever again.

What goes back into your closet should be folded vertically Marie Kondo mentions, so that in the drawer you are able to see all that you own. She also says clothes that seem to look “happier” hanging up can be stored that way. It’s best to have the lightest color clothes in the front hangers, and the darker and bulkier clothes in the back. This creates more space and flow in your closet space, and you will be able to dress yourself with ease.

I don’t want to go into too much detail about organizing the items in your closet that you have left just yet though because Marie Kondo says you should be sure to discard everything in all the categories first before you begin organizing. In my very last post of this seven day series, we will go into depth on the organization technique she has created.

Remember now to discard these items mindfully, give as much as you can to a local thrift shop, and anything that’s too tattered can usually be recycled. Now that you’ve seen the massive amount of clothing you are discarding, I’m sure you will be more careful of what you choose to bring in! I know I am.

Get yourself ready to continue clearing out your home of things no longer serving you, tomorrow you can tackle the next category.

Until then, enjoy your new found closet space!

click here to move on to the next challenge of this Konmari Declutter!

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